The Easiest Headband Ever

Um…So yeah, I love headbands.  I wear them all the time.  When I find a particular size or style that I like, I tend to need more than one.  Here is an easy solution to “I need something to go with this outfit because my hair is kinda scary today…”  I happened to have had one of those days today.  After deciding that I didn’t want any of the ones that I currently have in my stash, it was time to make one…but out of what?  How about that ribbon that I picked up because it was pretty and I could use it for… something.

It will probably take longer to decide on which ribbon you want to use than it will take to actually make this headband.  So why not make a few and save yourself the extra time trying to narrow down that decision.

Here’s what you’re going to need…

  • Ribbon of your choice
  • 2 elastic hairbands
  • scissors and your sewing machine

Yep, that’s all you need.

So grab your hairbands Overlap them

Pull the part that’s in the front through the one in the back and back to the front.  Does that make sense?

It should now look like this.
Fold the end of your ribbon over like a 1/4″ or so.  It doesn’t have to be exact, this is simply to keep the raw edge from showing when you sew it.

Take your folded edge an wrap it over the end of your hairband.  (I covered the metal part of the hair band, I think most don’t even have that metal part anymore!)  Now your ready to sew.

Sew close to your edge, making sure that you backstitch  a few times to reinforce the seam.  At this point you can take your ribbon and wrap it around your head to get an idea of how long you want it to be and cut it to the desired measurement.  Repeat with the other side, making sure that your ribbon isn’t twisted before you sew!  (I cut my ribbon at 18″, after sewing it and trying it on, I realized that it was too big, so I just folded it over a couple of times and sewed it again and it was perfect. )

And that’s it! Easy.

Enjoy your new headbands.  It’s a great way to use extra ribbon you have laying around!  I think that I may make a few more of these with a couple of strands of narrow ribbon together.  The possibilities are endless, really.

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Simple Little Lady Dress

I’ve intended to post this tutorial for quite some time. I had a bout half a yard of fabric that I just couldn’t decide what to do with it.  My little lady loves purple, and I loved the fabric.  So the easiest dress ever was created for her.  Have some extra fabric laying around?  This is a great way to use it.  I’ve made several variations of this dress.  I love the dress with a contrasting panel on the bottom.  You can use ribbon for the straps to simplify the dress even more.

Here’s what you will need:

  • a measurement of the recipient (for the proper length)
  • enough fabric to achieve this length with the addition of seam allowances (extra 3-4 inches)
  • any type of desired embellishments (for a contrasting panel. fabric straps or ribbon straps)
  • 1″ elastic
  • thread, scissors, ruler, rotary cutter and mat (not required, but they sure are nice to have!)

To begin determine the length that you want your dress to be add 3-4 inches and this will be your length.  For the width, fold your fabric in half, bringing your selvage edges together.  Press that folded edge that you’ve created and then use it to make a straight cut.  You should now have two pieces of fabric.  For most pieces of standard 44″ wide cotton you should have two 22″ by your desired length pieces.  This will be your two main panels.

For the straps, determine how long you want them to be.  I made my straps 9″ long.  So either cut two pieces of ribbon to 9″ or make your own out of fabric.  If you want to make your own, start with a 3″  by your length, but for convenience I’m going to say 9″ .  Take your 3″ by 9″ strip and fold in half, right sides together, matching the long edges. Press.  Sew a 1/4″ seam, back stitching at the beginning and end. Press seam open, turn right side out.   Center the seam and press.  You can also top stitch the edges if you want.  Now your straps are done.For the main part:

Place right sides together.  Pin and sew the length of the side seams, using a 1/2″ seam allowance.  Press seam.

Now, you want to make the elastic casing.

Fold edge over 1/2″ ; press edge.  Fold pressed edge over 2″;press again.  This will create the casing, pin to hold in place.  Sew 1/2″ from the top all the way around.  Next sew as close to the bottom folded edge that you created, making sure that you will have a casing large enough to hold your 1″ elastic.  Leave a 2″ opening; feed your elastic through.  Sew the ends of your elastic together, I usually overlap the edges and make several zig zag stitches to ensure that it’s going to hold!  Sew your opening closed.

Sew your straps about 5.5 ” from the edges.  You’ll have to stretch your fabric out to measure this, pin and sew right above your elastic casing.  Make sure to back stitch to reinforce the straps.

To finish fold the bottom edge over 1/4″; press.  Fold over 3/4-1″ , press.  Pin and sew all the way around.  You are finished!!

Now, if you wanted to do a contrasting panel at the bottom, simple determine how long you want it and sew it on to each panel at the beginning.

Marlo Bloom Handbag

This is the Marlo Bloom handbag, it’s from Heather Bailey’s line of patterns.  I used fabrics from Park Slope by Erin McMorris.

My first thought when I saw this bag was “That is a really cute bag!  Looks pretty easy and straightforward.”  After many a broken threads and needles.  I must conclude that I did not love constructing this bag.  In fact, I had a tough time sewing through all of those really thick layers.  I don’t know if it was simply errors on my part or if anyone else has had any difficulty with this particular pattern.

What I do like about this pattern is that it’s reversible.  The flower is actually a pin/brooch so you could wear it or pin it to another bag. 

It was an order for a friend in NC.  I also made another one of these for her. I think that you know my love of this particular pattern.  Again, I was not disappointed.  It is a pattern that I will revisit often I think!